Breathy shame and the place of Hebrew in the work of Jerome of Stridon

Hunt, Thomas E. (2018) Breathy shame and the place of Hebrew in the work of Jerome of Stridon. Religion and Theology. pp. 1-27. ISSN 1574-3012

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Abstract

This article analyses the place of Hebrew in Jerome‟s work by situating it in wider patterns of late antique masculinity and shame. Drawing on Kosofsky Sedgwick and Fanon, it shows how shame is a spatial affect. Discussions of Hebrew in Jerome‟s work emphasise the particular spaces in which Hebrew is written, read, or transported. One space is particularly important for Jerome‟s Hebrew translation: the space of the mouth as it inhales and exhales language. Focussing on space, language, and breath reveals why Hebrew is particularly shameful for Jerome and explains some of the apparent ambiguities in his discussions of translation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Originally published Hunt, T. (2018) 'Breathy shame and the place of Hebrew in the work of Jerome of Stridon', Religion and Theology [Early online], DOI: 10.1163/15743012-02503013.
Divisions: Faculty of of Arts, Society and Professional Studies > Department of Art and Humanities
Depositing User: Ms Hazel Barham
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2018 15:23
Last Modified: 17 Dec 2020 06:10
URI: https://newman.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/17239

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